Keep Your Trees Clear of Power Lines This Storm Season

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Keep Your Trees Clear of Power Lines This Storm Season

It’s December, which means we have well and truly reached storm season in Queensland.

As history tells us, it’s best to be prepared this time of year rather than wait until the last minute, and that includes inspecting your property where power lines are concerned.

Last year thousands of homes across the State were left without power after numerous storm cells hit the east coast, knocking down trees and power lines faster than emergency services could restore them.

To help prevent the number of power outages this storm season, Independent Tree Services is advising all home owners to contact a professional arborist to trim trees around power lines, maximising the safety of both your home and the neighbouring properties.

Trees that have grown near power lines are a safety hazard and must be removed or pruned on a regular basis as they can sway during a severe weather event, such as a thunderstorm or in high winds.

If a tree does come into contact with power lines, electricity can pass to the ground causing a potentially serious fire and safety hazard along with power outages.

Limbs over-hanging power lines must be pruned because of the threat of falling on the power lines during a severe weather event that could cause extensive outages and damage.

Trees that are also growing near primary lines should be pruned before they actually touch the power lines.

It is very important that home owners do not attempt to trim trees near power lines. If you have trees on your property that are growing near power lines, make sure you engage a qualified contractor or arborist from Independent Tree Services.

 

How much distance should there be between a tree and power lines?

The exact amount of clearance at any given site varies considerably and is dependent on the voltage and construction of the power line, the combined movement of the power lines and trees during severe weather conditions, the growth of the tree species, and the position of the trees in relation to the power lines.

When you start landscaping around your home, Independent Tree Services advises that you first look up before planting trees and to not plant trees if power lines are overhead.

If the power lines are overhead, evaluate the species of trees you wish to plant outside of the power line right-of-way.

 

The diagram below illustrates some examples of distances between tree and power lines, as provided by TasNetworks.

 

Keeping Trees clear of powerlines

 

Customer A is responsible for clearing vegetation inside their property boundary and underneath the power line that takes the electricity supply from the pole in the street to their property.

Customer B is responsible for clearing vegetation inside their property boundary and underneath the power line that directly supplies power to their house. However, the energy operator is responsible for clearing the vegetation growing inside customer B’s property boundary underneath the power line, which supplies electricity to an adjoining property.

Customer C is responsible for clearing vegetation inside their property boundary and underneath the power line that takes the electricity supply from the pole in the street to their house.

Customer D is responsible for clearing vegetation inside their property boundary and underneath the power line that takes the electricity supply from the pole in the street to their house.

 

Contact Independent Tree Services on (07) 3888 4202 to arrange an inspection of any trees near powerlines inside your property.

 

2017-05-30T09:16:28+00:00